Category: Goals & planning

Mental Skills for Athletes: Goals

It is easy to get caught up in the daily grind, and forget to stop and look at the big picture.

Today – now! – check your long-term and season goals.

(You have these written down somewhere easily accessible, right?.)

How are you progressing towards your goals?
Do you need to change any of your habits or plans to achieve what you want?
Do you need to update any of your goals?

Every day, week, month, training block and season, we are hustling, hustling, hustling. In the never-ending race to the finish line, make sure you are doing the small daily things that will help you achieve your goals.

 

Monday Motivation: Swimming World Records from London 2012

Swimming World Records from London 2012 Olympics

From the Olympics video vault: all the World Records broken during the 2012 London Olympics, recapped in 90 seconds.

Nice little bit of swimming inspiration!

It’s Labor Day in the US, the official end to Summer, and we’re all looking into the Autumn/Fall and then Winter… what are you doing to gear yourself up for a good off-season?

Monday Motivation: One Reason You Can Do Anything You Set Your Heart On

Monday Motivation

Initially I chuckled when I saw the ingenuity of their solution to the problem, but by the end I was struck dumb and in awe of the lady who is going out and doing all the things she wants to do, with no regard to any inherent obstacles.

The lesson I took from the video is:

Don’t let anything get in the way of anything you want to do.

Ever.

Duct Tape Surfing on Vimeo on Vimeo

Duct Tape Surfing

Photo credit: Duct Tape Surfing’s facebook page. Follow them here: Duct Tape Surfing

Monday Motivation: Ironman Hawaii World Championship 2009

Ironman Hawaii World Championship 2009

One from the archives. An oldie but a goodie.

Watch this before your next session, and be inspired:

In the words of Waterboy, YOU CAN DO IT!

What tools do you use to keep your motivation levels up?

5 Triathlon Race Day Mistakes to Avoid: Lessons from the New York City Triathlon 2013

While a lot of hard goes into any triathlon plan, a key element is an holistic approach to reviewing your races. To improve your triathlon performance, you need to be consistently learning from your mistakes, both in training and on race day.

I recently raced the New York City Triathlon and, long story short, it did not go well.

At all!

It was a fun event, particularly all the spectators and volunteers, but maaaaaan was it a tough day at the office!

As much as I wanted to expel it from memory, I forced myself to sit down and review what went wrong. It can be a tough exercise, but  ultimately being honest with yourself will help you identify areas where potentially big gains can be made in your next race.

Here are my race day triathlon lessons:

1) Nutrition is key for triathletes

My biggest error for this race was my nutrition. I simply tried too hard to eat well the day before. I had a big lunch rather than dinner to give myself time to digest but I also snacked too much during the evening which left me full and lethargic on race day morning.

I wrote out a to do list for race-day morning but still managed to forget some snacks on the long walk up to the swim. Given there was a good 45 minutes (and a 1 mile walk) from transition closing to swim start, this might have had an impact.

On the bike, I probably did not drink enough water due to my stomach feeling ‘full’, and again on the run, I skipped the first few aid stations as I was struggling with GI distress. This may not have been a bad idea but I definitely had no gas on the day.

Maybe it’s time to test new pre-triathlon nutrition and race-day snacks.

2) In a triathlon, race your own race

Keep calm and run your race

Despite being an experienced swimmer,  having good swim technique and a solid grasp of triathlon swim tactics, I forgot all my experience and in my haste to be competitive, I started the swim too fast.

I was gasping for air by 600m and had to dial it back in order to catch my breath and get into my normal rhythm. As a result, I tired myself out and lost time – a double whammy that is every triathlete’s nightmare!

I let my anxiety get to me, instead of focusing on my race, my pace and my technique. I train to start steady, build my pace and negative split my swims, and I threw away all those hours in the pool in the course of an anxiety-racked first 200m.

Swim, bike and run your OWN race. Focus on yourself first and your pacing, and then start kicking ass!

3) Race-day training and practicing triathlon transitions

One thing I certainly did not do was practice my transitions. From a non-scientific review of the results, I lost 3-4 minutes on my (would-be) rivals during T1. Had I been competitive on the day, that would have been the end of my race.

I even put my bike shoes on the wrong feet! So, lesson learned, I will practice my transitions before my next race!

And not the changing equipment, but running after the swim and jumping on a bike while out of breath, and then running on wobbly legs again after T2. I simply wasn’t able to get going quickly enough to be effective. Watching the pros and how seamless they do it is inspiring.

4) Equipment – know it, test it, trust it.

man on an old bicycle

(Feministe blog)

No matter what you are using, know and trust your equipment.

I adjusted my saddle the day before the race. Major error, as I wasn’t used to it, it wasn’t effective and I just didn’t feel at one with the bike on race day. I should have left it as is, or gone to my fitting guy, but I just had this nagging doubt that plagued me all week.

The old adage, “don’t do anything new on race day” holds perfectly true. A mantra for the ages. Still annoyed with myself for this one.

5) Stick with it.

It might be a horrible race, and all you want to do is quit and lick your wounds, but (as long as you’re not injured) persevere: it will help develop that race day toughness. As bad as it seems now, the next race will seem so much easier because you stuck with it when times were tough (figuratively and literally!).

I’m glad I finished, even though I was 30+ mins behind my goal time. Given all the mistakes above, apart from persevering, the only other good thing to come out of this race was my bike tires getting a good cleaning thanks to a little moisture on the roads!

Here are some good quotes on failure, if like me, you struggle to see the positives:

  • “I have not failed I have just found 10,000 ways that did not work.” Thomas Edison
  • “Remember that failure is an event not a person.” Zig Ziglar
  • “Success is the ability to go from failure to failure without losing your enthusiasm.” Winston Churchill
  • “Just because you fail at one thing doesn’t mean you will fail at everything.” Marilyn Monroe

Conquer the New York City Triathlon – New and updated for 2013!

The Aquaphor New York City Triathlon is a fun event, with tons of people flying in to tackle a great race and enjoy a weekend in the Big Apple. With a run through Manhattan and Central Park, it is rightly a popular race, but it is also a difficult course.

I have raced the NYC Triathlon a few times, and coach Team in Training and Tri Latino teams for this race, practicing the route regularly throughout the year. Here are my top tips to help deal with some of the tougher elements of the course. Give them a read and profit from some insider knowledge!

Tips for the Aquaphor New York City Triathlon

Let me know if you have your own tips to add, or any specific questions.

Read the athlete guidecourse description, etc. on the official New York City Triathlon website well in advance! Do it before you do anything else. If you have supporters coming, the Spectator Guide is full of useful info too – make them read that rather than asking YOU stupid questions and distracting you from vital race day prep!

Mandatory race briefings: These are a compulsory element and there for your benefit and safety. Try and attend on Friday (12-7pm) before the hordes descend on the hotel over the weekend. It’ll be a much easier task and you can enjoy the expo. Show up on time to your briefing – they don’t admit latecomers and you don’t want to be hanging around aimlessly. There’s a city to explore and much pre-race relaxing to be done.

Racking your bike: You have to leave your bike in transition on Saturday afternoon (~2-9pm). Cover your bike with plastic bags in case of rain, and deflate your tires a little bit to avoid them going POP! in the sun. I’ve jumped at many an exploding tire in the background while setting up!

You don’t want to turn up to your bike on Sunday morning only to find you have to fix a flat! Bring a pump to re-inflate them on Sunday morning. Even if you don’t need it, you will make a lot of BFF’s if you have a pump to share!

There is plenty of security there, but don’t leave your other gear there, just the bike. You don’t want it getting moved, scattered, misplaced, rained on, etc. overnight. Bring it with you on Sunday morning.

Pay attention to the new security measures. Official clear plastic bags only, no Camelbaks (UPDATE: apparently they are now allowed again – but pay attention to announcements for any changes), etc. Read up and come prepared. Adjust your training this week accordingly.

Bring a torch and headlamp for pre-race set-up. It will be dark at 5am and while there is lighting, you will be glad of it when you are poking around in your bag looking for your lucky teddy bear.

Walking to the swim start: You walk from ~72nd St transition area to the swim start at ~99th St. That’s 27 blocks or over a mile. Leave enough time to set up transition, walk up, collect your chip, drop off some belongings, etc. Wear some comfortable shoes that you don’t mind forgetting about. Bring a mag (to read, not for your gun. No guns allowed in transition), do your stretching, visualize your race, relax on the grass. Bring some snacks, gels and a water bottle as you will be there a while. Talk to your teammates.

From kelseytraining.com (now defunct)

Relax! Don’t stress about the swim. The water is (officially/technically) clean. Read up on the swim start procedures. Watch the waves ahead of you to get an idea of how it works.

In the water you might bump into some flotsam but ignore it. It ain’t a 3-eyed critter, just some driftwood. Carry on.

NYC Triathlon swim start tips

Let the current do the work. Take advantage of the fastest, easiest swim you’ll do in a triathlon. When you jump in (don’t dive!), the current will whisk you down river. Don’t stress, it is benign and trying to help! Get on your belly and start stroking. Be glad of the current. If you don’t like the idea of jumping in with 30 other athletes, let them jump first, wait a second or two (but not too long) and then go for it, start your race!

Swim to the outside, away from the wall where the current is strongest and let it carry you home. Near the wall is where the water will be choppiest, and the current the weakest.

You don’t need to do a lot of sighting in the swim as you will have the wall to your left which will take you down to swim finish in a straight line. There are also signs marking the route at 500m, 1000m, etc. Now is the time to practice breathing to your left in order to track your progress and ensure you are swimming parallel to shore, and in a straight line.

At the swim finish let the lifeguards pull you up. Swim right into the dock and take your time standing up. The floor is muddy (and gross) and you don’t want to get dizzy as you stand up.

Grab a quick shower on the way to transition to clear the Hudson muck, and then make your way casually to transition. It’s another 5-7 blocks back to your transition area. Read the course guide, to prep for the route in and out of transitions.

Transition: There are two different transition areas (red & yellow) and specific routes in and out for bike and run. Basically, run in and out of one entrance/exit and bike in and out of the other entrance.

Bike start: After cruising out of T1 (watch out for wayward, dizzy swimmers running to T1) you hit “Hot Corner” which is a sharp, 90 degree turn into a steep uphill. Thus, make sure you rack your bike in the easiest gear so you can get up that hill. There are crowds right on that corner for the bike start and swim finish, so make sure you don’t fall over in front of them!

via CNN

Hydrate! It will be hot out there.

Bike course: The course is crowded, particularly on the bike, with scant regard for drafting rules, and a lot of dangerous riding. This is partly due to newbies but also to aggressive, overly competitive athletes. Be alert, call your passes, check before you pull out to pass, ride defensively. It might cost you a couple of minutes but you’ll minimize the risk of crashing out.

There are rolling hills on the course. Take note, often in the city, hills are underestimated.

At the end of the bike course you ride past transition down to 59th st before looping back to 72nd St and into transition for T2. Read the course map so you aren’t surprised by this. It is utterly demoralizing when you are looking forward to getting your butt off the bike, only to have to cycle an extra 20 blocks!

On the way back in for T2, remember what goes up, must come down! Ride slowly down that steep hill into transition. Some of the volunteers may be overzealous New Yorkers and will not be shy in stopping you and “helping” you off your bike.

The run is fantastic! The crowds along 72nd St are so supportive, loud and motivating. However, first you have to tackle a short, steep hill out of T2 onto the roads. Manage that part, especially given your legs will be jelly after the bike. Once you reach the crowds and the adrenaline starts pumping, don’t go crazy. Enjoy their cheering, but manage your pace. 72nd Street is uphill and over half a mile long. You don’t want to cramp up as soon as you get into the park!

Take advantage of the aid stations for water and nutrition, as NYC can be hot and humid in the summer, even at 8am or 9am.

There are some nice, rolling hills in Central Park to keep you on your toes. They gradually get tougher until you are at the northern-most part of the course near Harlem (video of Harlem Hill, opposite direction). After the downhill Harlem Hill section as you turn south, there is one last tough hill to conquer before the gradients ease off.

Once you conquer those hills and start heading south on the east side of the park it is relatively flat before you hit downhill Cat Hill and arrive at 72nd St where the crowds will again welcome you!

Just when you expect to turn left for the finish line, you will have to turn right and run around a little-who-put-that-there-and-why-the-heck-do-I-have-to-run-around-it fountain before looping back for the finish line. Read the course map and there’ll be no surprises on race day!

Look out for cheer sections like Team in Training and Tri Latino‘s support crews. Feed off their energy. They are cheering YOU on as well.

Once you have finished kicking ass, the finish area is crowded with friends, relatives, toursits and well-wishers. Grab your recovery nutrition and go find your supporters. It is best to make a plan in advance otherwise finding each other will be tough.

Good luck and have fun. Remember: Strong like bull.

Then hit the city to celebrate.

The Best Way to Save Time AND Swim Faster: Do More With Less!

Most of us have limited time to train and/or very well developed procrastination skills. It is very easy to lose a lot of time preparing for or delaying the start of training. Particularly with swimming when you have to get to the pool, change, get in, etc.

I wonder what the average time unnecessarily lost per session is?

Swimming workout for triathletes

From Mike Gustafson’s genius Twitter feed ‏@mikelgustafson

The best way to save time and maximize the training benefit of each allocated hour is to have a plan in place. Know exactly how you are going to spend your time.

We are also creatures of habit, and developing a routine will help us mentally as we avoid stresses, problems and uncertainties that can cause us to lose time or even avoid training altogether.

If you struggle with the swim, you want to ensure you are getting the most out of each session. Avoid wasting time like the above “set”. The best triathletes are ruthlessly efficient with their training. Get in, work hard, get out, move on.

Apply the following  structure to your swim workouts, to ensure you are efficient with your time in the pool. Every swim session should have each of:

1) Warm-up – start steady and increase the pace. do some sprints if you are doing a main set of fast intervals. Include some combo of swim, drill, pull and kick
2) Drills – best to do this as part of the warm-up when you are fresh and can do the technique to a high standard
3) Main Set – this is where the main effort occurs. It might be aerobic or faster, more intense work.
4) Warm down – important to let the heart rate come down to resting pace, and it will help you not sweat back at the office!

Use this set-up no matter how little time you have for a session. It will help you proceed directly and efficiently through the workout  and achieve a rewarding level of work.

Another key tip is to pack your bag in advance, e.g. the night before, so you are not scrambling to throw your gear together while running out the door, and you don’t show up at the pool without a key piece of equipment. Save time and avoid raised stress levels!

Of course, all of the above applies to all sports and training sessions – be they bike, run, yoga, weights, etc.

31 Easy Tips to Sporting Excellence #29: Invest in Recovery

“31 Easy Tips to Sporting Excellence” is a series of those tips that will kick your performance to the next level, without any inordinate expenditure of time or money. How are you going to reach your goals?

Today’s tip to enhance your performance is #29: Invest in Recovery

Recovery for triathletes and ironman is important

I have had a few requests from various parties recently about recovery – what are the whats and the hows and the whys of effective recovery?

There are  – of course, since when was triathlon ever simple?! – many facets to post-exercise recovery, and many are open to debate so please let me know what I’ve forgotten or under/over-stated.

What is not in question is that proper recovery will boost performance by preventing injury and allowing you to perform at higher level for longer.

So, what should you be doing to recover after working out?

  1. Post-exercise warm down: do this purely for safety reasons if nothing else, as it allows your heart rate to return to a normal, resting state, and avoid a drop in blood pressure could drop and dizziness.
  2. Stretching: helps relax the muscles, flush out toxins and ultimately helps with flexibility which in turn helps prevent injury.
  3. Hydrate: hopefully you will be well hydrated from drinking throughout your workout, but be sure to drink plenty of fluids afterwards to aid recovery. We often lose weight while working out – this tends to be lost water. Drinking after training helps replace lost fluids and prevent sore muscles.
  4. Eat, eat, eat! as soon after training as possible, preferably within 30-60 minutes. Recommended foods vary, but some balance of protein and carbohydrates is important. Chocolate milk is on most lists as it contains both protein (to promote muscle repair) and simple carbs (to replenish glycogen). I like a banana as well. Make sure you have a good balanced meal after training to fuel your recovery.
  5. Massage: treat yourself to a pro or spend 10 minutes with your foam roller. One is more pleasurable than the next, but both methods may help flush out lactic acid, reduce swelling and heal faster.
  6. Naps & sleep: Get plenty of sleep to allow your muscles to recover. Increased sleep has been linked to improved performance, as when we are quietly (wait, do you snore?!) dreaming, our body is at work repairing our muscles.
  7. Cold/Hot therapy: in the form of hot/cold showers, ice baths and ice packs help boost circulation and flush out toxins. The other day I left my spinning class in my shorts and t-shirt went out into freezing weather on the way to the car. While all my muscles froze in the wind, this is NOT a recommended approach!
  8. Rest days: give yourself regular days off where you do nothing at all except enjoy some rest. While many feel the urge to keep training, a day off will allow you to perform better over the long term.
  9. Active recovery: is exercising at low-intensities and can include the warm-down immediately after a tough main set, or going for an easy swim shortly after your week’s long run. Studies show that rather than resting, active recovery helps flush out lactic acid and has psychological benefits – who doesn’t enjoy a nice, easy session from time-to-time?

There is a lot you can do to help you recover quickly and more effectively. While adopting the tricks above may take some practice, they are relatively easy and quick. Build them into your training plan and your daily routine.

Tons of equipment is available to help e.g. eye masks for a nap, ice packs, compression socks, foam roller, protein shakes and more.

Don’t just work hard during practice. Your training extends beyond your timetable and into recovery hours. The pay-offs will be clear over the course of a long season.

What have I missed? Vote now and I will try to include in the last couple of posts of the series!

The “31 Easy Tips” Series:
#1: Drink Water First Thing in the Morning
#2: 
Write Down Your Goals (Now!)
#3:
 Ask an Expert
#4: 
Start Stretching
#5: Track your progress towards your Goals
#6: Take a Cold Shower
#7: 
Incorporate Drills into your Workouts
#8: 
Superfoods for Superperformance
#9: Get Some Rest
#10: Cross train
#11: 
Reward Yourself
#12: Don’t Breathe in the Pool
#13: 
Take a Bath
#14: Do Squat!
#15: Get Yourself a Mentor
#16: 
Do Yoga
#17: Be on Time
#18: Leave Your Bucket of Troubles at the Door
#19: Stay Healthy!
#20: Do LESS Freestyle
#21: Grind it Out on the Foam Roller
#22: Engage Your Core
#23: Don’t Break the Bank!
#24: Be Persistent and Patient (Like Skyscraper Builders)
#25: Kick!
#26: Sprint!
#27: Race-day training
#28: Visualize Victory

31 Easy Tips to Sporting Excellence #28: Visualize Victory

“31 Easy Tips to Sporting Excellence” is a series of those tips that will kick your performance to the next level, without any inordinate expenditure of time or money. How are you going to reach your goals?

Your commitment to training hard for miles and miles is but one tool to excel in sports (and other endeavors). The hard work is required, but your effectiveness will only be maximized by taking a holistic approach to triathlon. Nutrition, recovery and technique are a few examples that will add to your performance gains with a little effort.

Today’s tip to enhance your performance is #28: Visualize Victory

10 Success Secrets of Olympic Greats - Phelps visualizing pre-race

Visualization is a technique that has been used by elite athletes for years. It involves mentally rehearsing your race and picturing yourself achieving your goals.

Picture yourself conquering a weakness, of racing fast and performing strongly. Imagine yourself crossing the finish line arms raised aloft, having achieved your goals.

If you get nervous pre-race, anticipate yourself calm and relaxed, steady heart-rate, breathing comfortably while awaiting the gun.

It is not my favorite sport but I am always impressed with the focus of baseball pitchers. They appear to visualize each and every pitch just beforehand.

The more you do it, the more stretch goals become achievable. Picture yourself swimming smooth and long, efficiently powering through the bike leg and finishing fast and strong on the run. The joy of visualization is that you can do it anywhere – while on a long swim or run, in the office, or commuting to work on the train.

Like anything, practice it and you will improve. I have heard anecdotes of swimmers, with practice, being able to rehearse their race within tenths of a second of their goal time!

Picturing yourself outperforming and conquering major challenges will help with your confidence on race day, and will help as you churn in the wash of the swim or as you struggle up that final, steep hill.

I’m in my 30’s but still fantasize about winning Olympic gold and later becoming a professional football player. The more I picture myself covered in glory, the more certain I am that it will happen!

Mo Farah wins gold - visualize yourself sprinting to victory in triathlon races

The difference between many athletes is often self-belief. Visualization can help your believe in yourself and your ability to achieve ANY goal.

What have I missed? Vote now and I will try to include in the last few posts of the series!

“31 Easy Tips” thus far:
#1: Drink Water First Thing in the Morning
#2: 
Write Down Your Goals (Now!)
#3:
 Ask an Expert
#4: 
Start Stretching
#5: Track your progress towards your Goals
#6: Take a Cold Shower
#7: 
Incorporate Drills into your Workouts
#8: 
Superfoods for Superperformance
#9: Get Some Rest
#10: Cross train
#11: 
Reward Yourself
#12: Don’t Breathe in the Pool
#13: 
Take a Bath
#14: Do Squat!
#15: Get Yourself a Mentor
#16: 
Do Yoga
#17: Be on Time
#18: Leave Your Bucket of Troubles at the Door
#19: Stay Healthy!
#20: Do LESS Freestyle
#21: Grind it Out on the Foam Roller
#22: Engage Your Core
#23: Don’t Break the Bank!
#24:
 
Be Persistent and Patient (Like Skyscraper Builders)
#25: Kick!
#26: Sprint!
#27: Race-day training

31 Easy Tips to Sporting Excellence #27: Race-day training

I am a firm believer in efficiency and effectiveness in training. I don’t have the time, energy or attention span to plough away for mile after mile racking up insane training volumes. Sign me up for those things that allow me to achieve more in less time and have fun while doing so!

“31 Easy Tips to Sporting Excellence” is a series of those tips that will kick your performance to the next level, without any inordinate expenditure of time or money. How are you going to reach your goals?

Today is #27: Race-day training

Prepare for race day with race-specific training eg open water swimming for triathletes

The triathlon season is long and there are many miles to be covered on the road to race day. Along the way do not neglect your race-specific training. What are the things that will save you minutes on race day and help you outperform your expectations?

Adapt your training to the course you plan on conquering. Get plenty of open water training done and be sure to note if the swim is in a lake or sea which can offer very different conditions on race day. Is the bike/run course hilly? Make sure you are training on hills otherwise the effort on race day will surprise you.

Open water swimming is far different and more chaotic than pool swimming. Be sure to tackle the currents, waves, lack of visibility of open water swimming. Work on your sighting so you do not end up swimming extra distance!

Brick workouts should be incorporated into your training. Swim and then bike, bike and then run. Help your muscles adapt to the changeover.

Nutrition is another element you can practice. What will your pre-race breakfast be? What snacks and fluids will you take during the race (be it in transition or on the bike)? Experiment with various foods and brands. You will like the taste of some and your body will reject others – make sure you find which ones before you ruin your race! Find out when and what quantity you should consume in and around your race – that is equally important. Nutrition can make a big difference.

Get your nutrition right for triathlon race day

Equipment is another variable that can make a difference. While a $10,000 carbon bike will help your cycling time, not all of us can afford that investment. Plus you’re doing it to push yourself anyway, right?! With so much equipment there are lots of choices and a lot of margin for error. What socks are comfortable and do not give you blisters? Do you have a pair of goggles that fit well and are comfortable? Are they tinted in case of sunny conditions and do you have a spare pair in case one breaks? Do you have a comfortable cap for the run and tri shorts? What sunglasses will you wear? These are all smaller items that will not make you faster, but knowing them will determine your comfort level and minimize stress in race week and on the day itself.

Practice your transitions – knowing your routine and making it second nature will be the difference between a 45 second transition and a 3 minute one, which in turn could be the difference between hitting your goal time or missing it. Practice what works for you in terms of order of events, whether to eat or not, do you put on socks for the bike, do you dry off with a towel or air dry? etc, etc.

Learn to fix a flat – Murphy’s Law will dictate that you will NEVER get a flat in training but halfway through the bike leg, BOTH your tyres will pop! Be prepared. Don’t end up sitting by the side of the road waiting for bike support to arrive!

Preparing the smaller, seemingly less significant items will give you the mental confidence to race hard. Free your brain from stress and focus on racing hard and fast!

What tips would you add to the list?

“31 Easy Tips” thus far:
#1: Drink Water First Thing in the Morning
#2: 
Write Down Your Goals (Now!)
#3:
 Ask an Expert
#4: 
Start Stretching
#5: Track your progress towards your Goals
#6: Take a Cold Shower
#7: 
Incorporate Drills into your Workouts
#8: 
Superfoods for Superperformance
#9: Get Some Rest
#10: Cross train
#11: 
Reward Yourself
#12: Don’t Breathe in the Pool
#13: 
Take a Bath
#14: Do Squat!
#15: Get Yourself a Mentor
#16: 
Do Yoga
#17: Be on Time
#18: Leave Your Bucket of Troubles at the Door
#19: Stay Healthy!
#20: Do LESS Freestyle
#21: Grind it Out on the Foam Roller
#22: Engage Your Core
#23: Don’t Break the Bank!
#24:
 
Be Persistent and Patient (Like Skyscraper Builders)
#25: Kick!
#26: Sprint!